Sunday, November 19, 2017

RUTV 3

All the latest journalism from the Rhodes TV3 class

I am not a mini Julius Malema

Posted by Nonceba On October - 16 - 2010

This documentary aims to show how not every member of the ANC or of the ANCYL is not the same, some of us do it because we want to bring about change within society and because of tenders and power.

S.C.A.M on MySpace

Posted by Paddy On April - 3 - 2009

  His lyrics have meaning to them as he tries to make the world a better place through his music. He speaks his mind and will not stop until his point has been reached… Read more about S.C.A.M on his MySpace Page:

http://www.myspace.com/scamcallcottstevens

Malema dupes Rhodes!

Posted by Paddy On April - 2 - 2009

 

                                 where-in-the-world-is-julius-malema-a-timeline2

This story about Julius Malema’s first visit to Rhodes campus caused quite a stir. People thought it was a rumour at first but then as soon as posters  were put up confirming the arrival of the ANC Youth League leader, people started to believe.

There were concerns that the event would be too big for Rhodes Campus Security and Grahamstown police to handle, with many saying that it could turn into a rally, with COPE and ANC supporteres clashing. The event was scheduled to be held at the Rhodes General Lecture Theatre which proved to be an unwise choice as it was too small to host the number of people that were expected to come. Students and lecturers alike were left stranded outside the venue as the GLT was filled to capacity. As journalist, we also found it difficult to get inside with security being very stringent on the amount of people allowed into the venue. We eventually did get inside because we pitched up quiet early and decided to set up our camera befoe the evnet had got under way.

Filming inside the actual venue was a diffucult process. We knew the venue would be packed with people: students, lecturers, journalists of all the kinds. There was hardly a clear space to even set up our tripod to get the visulas we wanted for the story. There was a constant movement of people up and down the aisles and people dancing everywhere, that getting good, quality visuals became quite tricky. The great thing though about a small venue with many people is the feeling of being close to the action. You are able to concentrate on indivulas as well as the group with ease. There was hardly a person we were unable to talk to. Everyone was accessible.

The man of the hour however, the one everyone had come to see, was a no-show. There were rumours swirling around that he had done this before on other campuses. There would be advertisements plugging his arrival, only for him not to show up. This had happened at UCT and UKZN, and many students were not surprised that he did not pitch. The fact that he did not come then became the story angle. It was just as juicy a story as one had he pitched. the various parties that were bringing various excuses as too why he was not there also proved interesting, with Rhodes admin and the ANC having a go at each other about him not arriving.

The final story proved to dfficult to edit as various subplots within the story could have been further expolored: the protest by the GAP members, the young dance group that encouraged people to vote for the ANC, the talk given by Young Commiunist League General Secretary, Bhuti Manamela, the small venue which left many disappointed people still waiting outside… I could go on. But ultimately the focus was on the non-arrival of Malema which proved to be the big selling point.

The Emergence of a Political Rapper

Posted by Paddy On April - 2 - 2009

The man behind the mic…
He hails from Pietermaritzburg in KwaZulu Natal and S.C.A.M is his rap name. Its meaning is simple. His initials are M.A.C.S which stands for Matthew Augustus Callcott-Stevens. S.C.A.M is his initials backwards, and this is to ensure that his name and who he is stays with him forever. A true cild of the new South Africa, S.C.A.M was born on the same day former president Nelson Mandela was released from prison, and shares his vision for a unified and more prosperous South Africa…..
Our story came about when S.C.A.M started to receive a lot of attention following the release of his debut album, “Rhythm and Rhymes”. He was featured on 5FM for an interview with Gareth Cliff, he was previewed in Oppidan Press, and local record label African Dope Records attempted to sign him to their label. However, all this hype turned bitter when S.C.A.M’s lyrics were scrutinized by members of the ANCYL in particular their president, Julius Malema. When we heard that S.C.A.M had in fact received threats from Julius Malema’s office and his parents were considering taking legal action, we decided the story would be relevant not only to students, but to the political climate with the elections approaching. While S.C.A.M lists a number of influences from Tupac to Nas to Skwatta Kamp, his greatest influence was the life altering experience of his father dying from lung cancer when he was a teenager. A devastating loss at any age, but too much to bare at 14, S.C.A.M went off the rails, ignoring his childhood friends and hanging out with thugs and dealers. Daily life soon involved fighting and smoking marijuana. Things reached an all time low when S.C.A.M tried to end his life. Thankfully he was unsuccessful. But with his anger consuming him, he realised that he needed to channel his destructive behaviour more constructively . When somebody suggested he try writing lyrics, he attempted it and really enjoyed it. S.C.A.M’s first song, “Heaven at 57,”(about his beloved father) gave him a sense of fulfilment that had been missing since his father’s death and encouraged him to write more. It was at this point that he was sent to boarding school to start a new life, and soon his focus shifted fromfighting and drugs to writing lyrics in every spare moment he had.

Rhodes political S.C.A.M hits 5fm!

Posted by Paddy On April - 2 - 2009

Read about S.C.A.M’s interview at 5Fm here!!

http://www.theoppidanpress.com/oppi//content/view/399/57/

Repetition

Posted by Paddy On April - 2 - 2009

Repetition  

 “Repetition” is S.C.A.M’s view on contemporary South African politics. The song encompasses the hardships of  the apartheid era, and then the transition period and then finally ends with the good Mandela did for South Africa. The third verse shows how the ANC have literally reversed apartheid and do not respect the people’s wishes; they only care about  being in power. This song was written to raise political awareness for the up coming elections in April.

 

Follow the Lyrics here!!

Track 5-Repetition
S.C.A.M Produced by Ash P

LYRICS

Intro: History repeats itself once again/completely against the constitution the supreme law of our nation/hell if I spit it/I’ll probably be like Skwatta Kamp and have my song banned on every radio station/ah fuck it/I’m just raising awareness

1st Verse: The history of South Africa was devastated by apartheid/heartache suffered fro the regimes mistake/laws made up for the Afrikaner race blacks coloureds and Indians spaced out/to limit their power/this caused a sour relationship still present today/the NP doesn’t mean much to me/that’s how history goes he who is evil is hated by the world/the world sat back and watched shit unfold/they didn’t give a fuck cause they already had our gold/it was up to the young and the old to bring the regime down/team work was needed and that’s why the ANC succeeded it took lot’s of bleeding and various leaders/but they did what was needed/and so came Madiba and things were looking up/

Chorus:
But as history repeats itself
It all comes down to power and wealth
Nobody cares about the people’s health
It’s just more lies coming out their mouths

2nd Verse:Mandela was deemed an offender/a terrorist/his followers had to pretend he didn’t exist/upon his release he ordered peace/he went on to receive the Nobel peace prize/and bought about the rise of a new South Africa/inspired Pienaar and his team to lift the Webb Ellis trophy/our economy was rising the sun was shining on our country/we were free and alive with prosperity/Madiba exhibited the way to rule prohibiting racial and violent actions to correct previous fractions/divisions/the rainbow nation incorporated blacks white’s and Asians all as one/previously prohibited our lives weren’t limited/controlled/we were able to role as we pleased/he built it up now look at the ANC

Chorus:
Let’s how history repeats itself
It’s all about power and wealth
Nobody cares about the people’s health
It’s just lies coming out their mouths

3rd Verse:This is the ultimate verse where I try make sure South Africa doesn’t get worse/the ANC is lead by a dimwit a twit whatever it describes Julius Malema/take up arms and fight/get rid of the white opposition/what happened to human rights/Mandela’s sight didn’t see light being taken out of SA/Jacobs got his own way of leading many MP’s leaving the ANC/JZ needs to lead properly/don’t stop what I’m going to say/the way things are going down sounds familiar/that’s the shit you heard in the 1st verse/don’t let the curse of apartheid destroy the new South Africa and make it worse/innocent until proven guilty has been abused/at the end of the day it’s those who abide by the rules who lose/misuse of power excuses for failure/continue this behaviour to disrespect our saviour/Madiba why’d you waste your time in jail to see JZ become president on bail
Chorus:
History repeated itself
It’s all about power and wealth
Nobody cares about the people’s health
It’s just more lies coming out their mouths
Bridge:
It’s just more lies coming out their mouths
Coming out their mouths
I hereby declare the victor of this struggle
It has returned
And therefore
History has earned the respect
Watch out it will get you

Video Today

Raphael HIV testing and support CentreThe Raphael Centre located in Grahamstown, South Africa is a HIV/AIDS testing and support centre. Lately, though, this haven for people infected or affected by the virus has been rought by troubles. The future of the centre is uncertain as it needs sponsors to ensure it’s survival. Meanwhile other issues, like an objecting neighbour are also posing problems for the centre which helps over 1 000 people every month.

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